Teach First

National Primary Offer Day: Teach First calls for people to teach in low-income communities

On Monday 18 April, as parents up and down the country find out the primary school their child will go to this September, new analysis from education charity Teach First highlights the tough choices that families from poorer backgrounds will have to make, about where they send their child.

Based on figures from Ofsted, the findings reveal:

  • The poorest families are four times more likely to have to send their child to a primary school which requires improvement or is inadequate compared to the wealthiest families.
  • The poorest families have less than half the chance of sending their child to an outstanding primary school compared to the wealthiest families.
  • In areas that have the highest proportion of Ofsted rated ‘Outstanding’ schools, average monthly rent for a two bedroom property is more than double rent in areas with the lowest proportion of these schools.

Positive national progress has been made, with the Government highlighting that 1.4million more children are now attending ‘good’ and ‘outstanding’ primary and secondary schools. However, as it is harder for schools serving low-income communities to achieve those higher ratings, families from poorer backgrounds are therefore less likely to be able to choose a good or outstanding school.  

Although great efforts are being made to change the status quo, current figures reveal that Blackpool, the Isle of Wight and Thurrock only have one outstanding primary school each. And in areas like Bradford and Kent, one in three schools serving the poorest 20% of postcodes is deemed to require improvement by Ofsted.

Great teachers and leaders are key to the success of any school and yet schools in the most challenging areas often struggle to recruit and retain the people that they need. Teach First, who works with schools across the country to improve the education of children from the poorest backgrounds, is calling on more talented individuals to join the teaching profession and work in schools serving areas of the greatest need.

The primary years are some of the most formative in a child’s lifetime, and with fewer good or outstanding schools available for families from poorer backgrounds, there are clear challenges that remain in closing the attainment gap between poorer children and their wealthier peers. We know progress can and is being made, with areas like Manchester, Middlesbrough and London providing an outstanding education for all children. In Manchester and Middlesbrough 70% of their outstanding primaries serve the poorest communities.

Those soon to finish university or considering changing their career can make a life changing difference to young people by applying to join Teach First’s Leadership Development Programme. All our participants teach and inspire children in schools serving low income communities.

The final chance to apply for the programme is on the 27th April via http://www.teachfirst.org.uk/apply. You could then begin transforming life chances of children from this summer.

Founder and CEO of Teach First, Brett Wigdortz OBE said:

“Every parent wants the best for their child, but as the costs of housing have soared over the years, parents from low income backgrounds face an unequal choice to ensure that their children’s school offers what’s best for them. Outstanding schools are unfairly concentrated in areas of wealth.

We know that primary teachers up and down the country are doing an incredible job of supporting their pupils from day one, by sparking their creativity and imaginations. But for children from poorer backgrounds, there are still challenges that must not be ignored.

As schools in London, Manchester and Middlesbrough have shown, we know that at the heart of the solution for improving schools is great teaching and leadership. With less than 10 days left to apply to Teach First’s Leadership Development Programme, we urge more soon-to-be graduates and career changers to step up to the challenge of teaching, and help more young people get the education they deserve.”

ENDS.

Notes to editors

For spokespeople and case studies, please contact William Staynes on 0203 117 2439 / 07976534730 / Wstaynes@TeachFirst.org.uk

Supporting information

Stark Contrasts

For more detailed case studies on any of these locations, please download a Microsoft Word file of this press release and see under 'Local Area Builder'.

In Blackpool there are no outstanding primary schools. In the Isle of Wight and Thurrock there is one, and in Portsmouth only 3.

In Bradford and Kent, one in 3 schools serving the poorest 20% of postcodes requires improvement. In Walsall it’s over 40% and in Doncaster it’s almost half. In Sunderland, the equivalent figure is less than 1 in 20. In Newcastle it’s 1 in 10 and in Oldham it’s 1 in 15.

In Bradford, half of schools serving the poorest 20% of postcodes is Outstanding, and it’s the same in Bury. In Stockport, it’s two-thirds. In Swindon, the equivalent figure is less than a quarter. In Barnsley, it is a quarter, and in Blackburn, it’s zero – not a single Outstanding primary serves the poorest communities.

In Manchester and Middlesbrough, 70% of their outstanding primaries serves the poorest communities. In more than one third of local authorities, less than one in ten outstanding schools serves a poor community. In Doncaster, Brighton, Blackburn, South Tyneside and Swindon, not a single outstnading school serves a poor community. In Stockport, Trafford, Warrington and Wirral, only 1 in 20 outstanding schools serves a poor community.

Methodology Notes

  • IDACI quintile is based on postcodes of intake (rather than the school postcode)
  • Quintile is quintile of schools rather than quintile of pupils. Schools in poorer areas are on average larger, so only 15% of pupils are educated in schools with top quintile intakes, whereas 26% of pupils are in schools with bottom quintile intakes
  • Excludes City of London (1 school, makes no difference)

Quality of Schools

 

Outstanding

Good

RI

Inadequate

Richest 20%

28%

65%

7%

0%

2

21%

68%

10%

1%

3

14%

72%

14%

1%

4

13%

68%

17%

1%

Poorest 20%

14%

67%

18%

1%

 

 

Outstanding

Good

RI

Inadequate

Richest 20%

929

2142

235

11

2

682

2243

327

24

3

447

2311

445

25

4

420

2159

530

46

Poorest 20%

441

2128

556

42

Quality of Places

 

Outstanding

Good

RI

Inadequate

Richest 20%

32%

61%

7%

0%

2

23%

67%

10%

1%

3

15%

70%

15%

1%

4

14%

68%

17%

1%

Poorest 20%

15%

66%

17%

1%

 

 

Outstanding

Good

RI

Inadequate

Richest 20%

212,794

406,763

48,123

2,187

2

167,829

486,694

70,897

4,814

3

127,752

593,786

123,893

5,479

4

135,511

661,694

165,861

14,532

Poorest 20%

169,380

739,168

189,427

16,401

Rental prices

Source: Private Rental Market Statistics, Valuation Office Agency

Based on 2 bedroom properties: self-contained properties with two bedrooms including houses, bungalows, flats and maisonettes.

Percentage of Schools Rated Outstanding

0% - 10%

10% - 20%

20% - 30%

30% - 40%

40% - 50%

50% - 60%

Average Median Monthly Rent for a 2 Bedroom Property

£594

£695

£835

£1,072

£1,400

£1,756

 

Percentage of Schools Rated Good or Outstanding

60% - 70%

70% - 80%

80% - 90%

90% - 100%

100%

 

Average Median Monthly Rent for a 2 Bedroom Property

£500

£638

£757

£901

£1,350

 

Only one authority has over half of schools outstanding – Kensington and Chelsea

Only one authority has 100% of schools good or outstanding – Kingston upon Thames

About Teach First

Working with universities, schools and businesses, Teach First is working towards achieving its vision by enabling its participants and ambassadors in the classroom to raise the achievement, aspiration, and access to opportunity of children from low socio-economic backgrounds, whilst developing a network of leaders with a life-long commitment to ending inequality in education from both inside and outside the classroom.

Teach First currently operates in Wales and in all regions across England: London, West Midlands, East Midlands, Yorkshire the Humber, North West, North East, South East, South Coat, South West and the East of England.

Trainees commit to a minimum of two years at their partner school, where they teach a Newly Qualified Teacher (NQT) timetable; and nearly three quarters choose to stay for at least a third year. Their 13 month Initial Teacher Training starts with the unique six-week Summer Institute which provides trainees with intensive preparation for teaching in their school. Trainees then complete both their PGCE training year and their first year as an NQT in their school.