Secondary student in classroom looking off to one side

Income defines how well children do at school

The education system provides less to those who need the most.

Income defines how well children do at school

The link between low income and low academic attainment is greater in the UK than almost any other developed nation. Children eligible for free school meals are less likely to get good GCSEs and go on to higher education.

This makes it more likely they will struggle throughout their lives, widening social inequality. It’s a cycle that we’re determined to break.

Educational inequality by the numbers

It's a problem that starts early and lingers throughout life.

Over 1/3 of kids entitled to free meals
Leave primary school without meeting the expected levels for reading, writing and maths.
33% of pupils on free school meals
Achieved 5 A*- C at GCSE, compared to 60.5% of pupils overall.
21% of pupils entitled to free meals
End up going to university, compared to 85% of pupils from private schools.
Lower than 50%
The chances that a poorer child will go to a school rated as Outstanding compared to their wealthier peers.
Fewer apprenticeships
In every part of England, a poorer young person is less likely to get a placement than their better-off peers.
10% less pay
Even with a degree, poorer young people are paid less than wealthier colleagues with the same qualifications.
Pupil raising his hand in a classroom taught by a Teach First teacher

We want every child in the UK to have a fair shot at their ambitions.

And you can help.

“We’ve been working with Teach First for seven years. The difference they make is huge.

Headteacher, West Midlands

We know this problem can be solved, because we've made progress towards it.

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